Making a Difference With The Monsoon Accessorize Trust This World Education Day

Since 1994, the Monsoon Accessorize Trust has been supporting projects that impact the most disadvantaged and vulnerable women and children around the world.

This World Education Day we’re shining the spotlight on our charity projects that are improving the lives of children and their families in slums near Delhi, who have no choice but to live and work on rubbish dumps.

The ‘rag-picking’ children support themselves and their families by rummaging through rubbish on the dumps in order to salvage scraps of cloth, paper and glass that can then be sold.  Many of them have younger siblings to look after, even though they are only children themselves.

THE TRUST

In association with Christian Aid and Phia Foundation, the Trust works to support these children through education, health and hygiene programmes. Through the charities, parents are encouraged to allow their children to visit bridge schools, where they are taught basic life skills and hygiene. The aim is to prepare these children for a more traditional education. This bespoke education scheme allows children and their families a better, brighter future. 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

Last year, Phia Foundation and Monsoon Accessorize Trust organised an educational visit to Ambedkar National Memorial. This trip taught children about the Indian constitutional value and the importance for every citizen of India, giving them a sense of belonging and an understanding of in Indian history. 

MEGHA AND PREETI’S STORIES

These sisters were both out of school and living in tough conditions. Once their parents agreed to send them to Phia’s education centre, the girls regained their confidence and self-belief and received a basic level of education and life skills. 

Due to the continuous education programme, they are now both doing well in the formal educational system. 

SONAM’S STORY

The youngest of six, Sonam is known as an introverted, sincere child. Three of her siblings were married at a young age due to dowry customs, while herself and the rest of her siblings work within the rag-picking colony in Bhowapur. 

Sonam regularly attended remedial classes at Jungu Education centre, run by Phia Foundation. Here she not only received basic support on health and education but also guidance on the school syllabus and other curricular activities. Due to her persistence and passion for learning, she was then admitted into the formal school system where she scored 91% in her annual exams. 

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Read more about the Trust’s work.

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